AIRetc… 18-19 Application Open

The Art Team at Edinburgh College Granton are delighted to announce our call for applications for our 2017-18 Artist in Residence (AIRetc) programme.

We are looking for 2 artists to contribute to one of the countries most successful and dynamic Art Departments. Now in its 7th year the Artist in Residence programme (AIRetc…) is an innovative scheme which provides recently graduated / professional artists who have previously studied a fine / contemporary art course at Edinburgh College Granton (formerly Edinburgh’s Telford College) with the opportunity to develop their knowledge, skills and experience in Art education while developing their creative practice in a dedicated studio space.

If you would like to be considered for the residencies please download the information below and the application form.  

Application Deadline Thursday 15th June 2018

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air-information-for-applicants 18-19

At work with Edinburgh International Film Festival.

By Alan Holligan, Chris Coatham, Joel Davidson, Victoria Rankin HND Contemporary Art Practice, Edinburgh College.

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CAPetc.. Lecturer Alan Holligan with Matt Johnson and Johanna St Michaels at the opening of Radio Cineola, Summerhall Gallery, Edinburgh June 2017

Earlier in the year I was approached by the Edinburgh International Film Festival to manage the install of a major new installation work by the creative team behind the ‘Inertia Variations’ a documentary by Swedish filmmaker Johanna St Michaels about the life and work of THE THE’s Matt Johnson.

As well as giving me the opportunity to brush up on some skills working on a live project three of our HND Contemporary Art Practice students were also able to get involved and gain valuable practical experience working with internationally renowned artists & designers from across the creative industries.

The large scale interactive multi-media work which features multi-screen video projections, sound works and 8m tall Radio Cineola: Radio Tower was developed in collaboration between Johnson, St Michaels, award-winning architect Jacob Sahlqvist, lighting designer Kate Wilkins, and poet John Tottenham is being presented alongside St Michaels documentary as it travels the world.

Before coming to teach at the Granton campus I worked in a dual role as fine art lecturer, and Installation / site manager for the Exhibitions & Events dept of Edinburgh College of Art.  The work was always varied and challenging but most importantly it was linked to, and supported my practice as an artist. I met some incredible artists and developed a variety of skills. So, when I was approached by my then manager and now Assistant Director of the EIFF, Diane Henderson, ‘to put the band back together’ I jumped at the chance to get involved and share the experience with students.

As well as gaining work experience the students also received passes to the EIFF and invitations to the opening premier and party. A fine return on a job well done!

“EIFF was delighted to work with students from Edinburgh College on the
Inertia Variations exhibition at Summerhall.  The students brought a
wonderful enthusiasm to their role and were an enormous, knowledgeable and
skilled resource.  Alan and his students worked extremely hard over a very
short period of time to install this fantastic exhibition, which in the
end, was a brilliant highlight of EIFF in its anniversary year.  We
couldn¹t have done it without them!”

Dianne Henderson Assistant Artistic Director Edinburgh International Film Festival

To capture the experience for their Professional Practice Portfolio the students, Victoria, Joel and Chris developed a series of questions and responses to help log the experience.

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Alan, Victoria, Chris and Joel at the opening party of EIFF at the National Museum of Scotland.

 Summerhall project interview questions:

Briefly describe the exhibition/project you were involved in:

Victoria Rankin: Help setting up an exhibition/installation called Inertia with our lecturer Alan Holligan, the artists and installation crew.

Chris Coatham: The project, named Radio Cineola: The Inertia Variations, was a collaboration between musician Matt Johnson, filmmaker Johanna St Michaels, architect Jacob Sahlqvist, lighting designer Kate Wilkins and poet John Tottenham. The collaboration resulted in a film and interactive installation based on the ideas and imagery featured in the film. The Summerhall gallery/art space in Edinburgh hosted both the exhibition and film as part of the 71st annual Edinburgh International Film Festival.

Joel Davidson: Radio cineola is a unique installation bringing together the work of musician Matt Johnson, filmmaker Johanna St. Michaels and architect Jacob sahlqvist. Michaels film the inertia variations blends into a conceptual multi media installation that spread throughout the dissection room of summer-hall.
What was the role of Edinburgh college students in the project?

V.R: Our role was to help set up the installation manually. We helped by carrying a lot of the necessary equipment to the dissection room & the other connecting rooms. We sealed the windows in every room to prevent light getting in and also helped construct the radio tower. We also set up lighting in one of the connecting rooms.

C.C: College students were on hand to assist with the installation; our duties included moving equipment and materials into the upstairs space, preparing the space itself including hanging blackout curtains, and assisting with the erection of a tall central “radio mast” which was the centerpiece of the exhibition. We also hung three large projector screens and assembled beds and other props, and hung signage to guide visitors to the exhibition.

J.D: Our role mainly consisted of supporting the needs of the artists by setting up parts of the exhibition as well as helping to erect a 8 metre tall radio tower. The work was rewarding but challenging as we approached certain hurdles when setting this exhibition up in a new setting.
What new skills/experience did you gain?

V.R: I gained work experience in terms of setting up for an exhibition – experience which will be vital in my career as an artist. It was also a pleasure to meet everyone involved. It was definitely a good way to make connections with fellows in the same industry.

C.C: This was our first time helping to install an exhibition that a) was not of our own work and b) was outwith the college. Therefore it was very much a new experience for all of us and it was great to meet the Summerhall and Film Festival staff and work with them.

J.D: This opportunity to work in an exhibition like this was a first for me but hopefully not the last. It gave us an opportunity to learn new skills working in a team along side musicians, filmmakers and designers to help realise an ambitious installation.
What challenges/problems did you face and how did you resolve them?

V.R: There were various challenges when setting up but only minor issues – miscalculations in measurements when we were sealing up all the windows with light-tight fabric. We also had to move a few tonnes of volcanic sand up one floor but we didn’t have the right equipment for the job so it took longer than we expected. These were only minor issues in an otherwise smoothly running operation, I think.

C.C: At times it was hard work to get a task finished on time; for example where a lot of manual handling was involved or where it was difficult to continue without direction from a supervisor, however with initiative and teamwork we overcame these small obstacles to get the job done.
Was the experience what you expected it to be? Why/why not?

V.R: It was tougher physically than I thought it would be but overall I was very pleased with the time I spent there. As mentioned, it was really nice to meet the people involved – the artists and the installation crew. It was such an insight into what goes on behind the scenes of setting up installations. A lot of work goes in – more than I realised. I have definitely benefited from the experience.

C.C: I think I went in to the project expecting it to be quite stressful, and though it was hard work at times, it was not stressful at all and in fact was very rewarding and fun to be involved in.

J.D: The experience overall was what I expected and more.  I did not expect to be working as close to the artists as we did. Helping them tailor the exhibition to a new space and overcome the challenges that this presented will be valuable in the future and was a welcomed break from any heavy lifting.
How did it feel to see the finished exhibition knowing that you had been involved?

V.R: It was an extremely proud moment as the exhibition was extremely interesting in itself.

C.C: At first I found it difficult to visualise how the exhibition would look once it was finished, but as the week progressed and we got closer to being finished it really came together and it was great to see the fruit of our labours (and that of many other people) resulting in such an impressive installation.

J.D: Seeing the final exhibition was a satisfying experience as I believe the work we all put in was vital to the show being ready on time for its opening.
Do you feel that the experience has been a valuable one in terms of gaining work experience? Would you do it again?

V.R: I definitely feel that it has been very valuable and I am so happy to have been involved. I most definitely would do it again, because there is so much to experience and learn from helping to set up an exhibition. It the kind of thing that would be different each time as well, which i find very intriguing and beneficial to my growth as an artist.

C.C: The experience was definitely a positive one and I would certainly do it again. The experience of working together under pressure to achieve a common goal was really rewarding and I would encourage any current or future students to get involved in any similar projects, should the opportunity arise.

J.D: This experience has given me valuable knowledge when it comes to working behind the scenes in a exhibition. The overall process of helping alongside artists, architects etc was a new experience and one that will serve me well in the future if the chance to work in similar conditions comes up again. The free lunches and party was a nice treat too.

 

 

 

 

Up town top rankin. TAXI !!

It was a day on the town for CAPetc today. Talbot Rice Gallery to start where assistant curator James Clegg gave us an introduction to both the galleries current shows. First up was The Beguiled Eye, Christopher Orr’s first solo show in Scotland, bringing together new and recent paintings and featuring, for the first time, the artist’s remarkable sketchbooks.

‘Orr’s oil paintings and watercolours offer enigmatic glimpses into other worlds where modern characters appear within expansive environments, laden with drama. The intriguing scenes derive from an appropriation of images from a vast range of visual materials, including National Geographic magazines, scientific manuals, 1950s snaps, art historical images and Super 8 films.’

Also on at the TR is gap in the air: a festival of sonic art which is “a celebration of music and sonic art in Talbot Rice’s Georgian Gallery, including performances by experimental musicians and artists, work by staff and students, workshops and academic discussions. The programme is dedicated to the experience of sound, the neo-classical space of the Georgian Gallery becoming a sounding-box for the most prescient themes in contemporary sonic art”

Next up was a quick walk up to Edinburgh College of Art for a talk by Mark McGowan aka The Artist Taxi Driver. As anticipated the talk was excellent and Mark gave us all a great deal to think about in relation to politics, culture and the role & responsibility or art & artists in contemporary society. Below is one of Marks videos which was playing as we took our seats in the lecture hall.

Thanks to Rhubaba Gallery & Studios for organising the event and for inviting CAP.

Changes: Settlement Projects

In yet another foray into the community CAP2 recently embarked on a project in collaboration  with the Settlement Projects community shop in Leith Walk. Participants in the project were tasked with selecting an object or objects from the shop and through a process of research and development effect a change in relation to their chosen object.

The intention of the project was to bring a new, alternate or enhanced understanding to the selected object. The change could be physical, conceptual or contextual.

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At the end of the project the transformed objects were represented in an exhibition organized by the participants.

We would like to thank the Settlement Projects Shop for their assistance, patience and continued support for the Change Project and we look forward to working with them again in the future.

The Edinburgh Settlement is a multipurpose organization with a rich history spanning more than 100 years of active local involvement. They are part of the international settlement movement; a global network of social action centres which aim to work closely with communities, representing and responding to their different needs and aspirations to promote social and environmental welfare and help bring about effective and lasting community development.

Find out more: https://www.facebook.com/settlementprojectsedinburgh/info?tab=page_info

CAP1 ESW Residency

A few weeks ago it was the turn of CAP1 to take up residence at Edinburgh Sculpture Workshop. Although an annual event for 7 years this was only our 3rd year in the new Bill Scott Sculpture Centre as part of our formal partnership with ESW. Since the new premises opened in June 2012 ESW and the college have had a formal partnership which has ESW designated as an Edinburgh College Employability Centre. The partnership allows students to undertake their Introduction to Sculpture course in a purpose built professional studio & workshop environment for the research, development and production of sculptural practice.

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As well as the formal sculptural practice developed during the residency a number of Professional Practice events took place including wood workshop induction and a talk by ESW Curator of Research Dan Brown who spoke to the residency participants about the facilities, history & philosophy of ESW as well as the education, exhibition and residency programmes. Other events included a studio visit with studio holder Kate Ive and a talk by RSA/ESW International Residency winner Norbert Delman whose exhibition Sweat / Suffer / Success was open in the gallery space. All the talks took place in the new multi function research space at ESW which is flexile enough to have round table talks and discussions as well as presentations. Having access to the space and resources meant we were able to have our annual Moving Image event curated by #exCAPer and regular guest lecturer Benjamin Fallon which was held over two evenings at ESW.

Next May we will return to ESW with CAP2 for their Diploma Exhibition by which time the second phase of the multi £million capital project ‘Creative Laboratories’ will have been open for 6 months and we are looking forward to spending a week working and exhibiting in the new spaces.

Click on the links below to see  blog posts by CAP1 ESW Residents:

Szabolcs Fricska:  http://sfricskacap.tumblr.com/post/101630305745/the-week-that-we-spent-at-the-edinburgh-sculpture

Yulia Vitten: http://iuliiavittencap.tumblr.com/post/101836631621/my-final-sculpture-from-the-week-at-esw-and-small

Magdealen Gunkowska: http://mgunkowskacap.tumblr.com/post/101166933302/my-experiments-with-plaster-and-construction

http://mgunkowskacap.tumblr.com/post/101171457022

Elena Cheltsova: http://echeltsovacap.tumblr.com/post/101429925954/esw-day-3-modelling-with-plaster-thought-of

Freya Taylor: http://freyataylorcap.tumblr.com/post/100831352454/collaborative-installation-lots-of-fun-i-was