DO OR DIE: Samantha Dick at the HUBCAP Gallery

In what we hope will be the start of a significant new approach to our site we have asked current HND CAP students to submit content of publication. We were delighted to recieve the following from current hndCAP year 2 student Anna Brodie. 

Each opening night at HUBCAP gallery so far has proven to be a certain type of good chaos and the same is to be said of the most recent from our very own Artist in Residence Samantha Dick, who is presenting their first solo show DO OR DIE. The exhibition is set in HUBCAP’S small but versatile space nestled in the back of Edinburgh College’s canteen and has shown how, once again, the committee of CAP students can pull off a very well executed and professional event.

This time around the space has been transformed through Samantha’s own artistic lens. Meticulously placed elongated black lines frame the room, putting purposeful constraints on the space, creating a simple black and white structure which is then disrupted by Dick’s colourful use of characterisation displayed across several different mediums.

Currently based between Edinburgh and Glasgow, Samantha studied at Edinburgh College before progressing on to Glasgow School of Art. After graduating from university last year, they have once again become a part of the Edinburgh College community. Initially as Artist in Residence (AIR) and most recently taking on the role of Learning Assistant (LA). In Samantha’s own words the basis of their practice is “their rejection of social expectation.” DO OR DIE extends their interest in this and questions “the structures of our complex contemporary world.”  Through use of what they call “theatrical play” and their characterisation of stereotypes Samantha reacts to the current socio-political climate. Taking influence from the 1950s nuclear family Samantha works to deconstruct societal ideals that traditional formulas as such represent, challenging the viewers own sense of normality. Samantha’s portrayal of Mr suit in “The Desk Studies” reflects current political and social chaos through balancing a “symbol of normality” with “acts of absurdity”. It shows how Samantha’s techniques in clowning and characterisation can address big issues just as well as, if not better than, more traditional mediums. The exhibition prompts us to question gender norms, social inequality and react to customary concepts of the dominant and subordinate.

Going forward Samantha is working hard as an LA and continuing their practice. Having recently shown work at Allsorts Royal Glasgow Institute Artist Film Festival as well as hosting exhibitions and events with the collective Where People Sleep of which they are a member and co-founder. You can find more information on Samantha at their website https://www.samanthadick.co.uk/bodies and keep up to date on recent work by following their Instagram @samanthadickart_

More information about Where People Sleep can be found on their Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/wherepeoplesleep/

Make sure you don’t miss out on the many exciting things to come from HUBCAP gallery by following them on Facebook by searching HUBCAP gallery and Instagram @hubcap.gallery

Be sure to look out for upcoming events connected to DO OR DIE.

Samanth Dick in Conversation: hubCAP Events

DO OR DIE: Panel Discussion: hubCAP Events

And if you haven’t already, get yourself down to Edinburgh College for a visit at HUBCAP to see the hard work of our students on the gallery committee, and Sam’s exhibition which will be open until Thursday the 5th of March. Gallery Opening times are Mon-Fri 10am-3pm.

 

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hubCAP Gallery Opens

Edinburgh’s newest artist run space opens at Edinburgh College Granton Campus.

Developed as a core element of our new Professional Practice and Exhibition programme on the HND Contemporary Art Practice Course we were delighted to launch hubCAP Gallery with an exhibition of 2D work by all the current participants of the course.

The launch was a fantastic success and and was well attended by freinds, family, students and colleagues from across the college but in particular it was  fantastic to see so many of the CAPalumni family coming from as far afeild as Dundee, Galashiels, Bathgate and Glasgow.

hubCAP is the first in a series of initiatives in development that will provide CAP students with real world experiences that will enable them to gain key knowledge and skills to identify and progress in their developing area of contemporary art practice and beyond. Additional initiatives will include campus based opportunities including; a lecturer shadowing / metoring programme, library placements with the Art & Design Subject Specialist and art journalism / marketing along with external placement opportunities with our external partners.

The gallery adopts a model of Artist Run spaces and is organised and facilitated by a selected committee of current HND CAP students who will develop and deliver a programme of exhibitions by emerging and early career artists and complimented by a and events and workshops programme.

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Visiting Artist: Dr Jacqueline Donachie

It was an enormous pleasure to welcome Dr Jacqueline Donachie to the Granton Campus of Edinburgh College today where she gave a fantastic talk about her approach to research practice, public art, social engagement, Sculpture, drawing and her current exhibition ‘Right here among them’ at the Fruitmarket Gallery in Edinburgh. After the talk Jacqueline took time to visit student run EPOCH8 gallery where she discussed her time on the Transmission Gallery committee and shared some great tips on artist run spaces. There was also time for a few tutorials with CAP1&2 students.

‘Right here among them is on at the Fruitmarket Gallery until 11th February 2018.

At work with Edinburgh International Film Festival.

By Alan Holligan, Chris Coatham, Joel Davidson, Victoria Rankin HND Contemporary Art Practice, Edinburgh College.

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CAPetc.. Lecturer Alan Holligan with Matt Johnson and Johanna St Michaels at the opening of Radio Cineola, Summerhall Gallery, Edinburgh June 2017

Earlier in the year I was approached by the Edinburgh International Film Festival to manage the install of a major new installation work by the creative team behind the ‘Inertia Variations’ a documentary by Swedish filmmaker Johanna St Michaels about the life and work of THE THE’s Matt Johnson.

As well as giving me the opportunity to brush up on some skills working on a live project three of our HND Contemporary Art Practice students were also able to get involved and gain valuable practical experience working with internationally renowned artists & designers from across the creative industries.

The large scale interactive multi-media work which features multi-screen video projections, sound works and 8m tall Radio Cineola: Radio Tower was developed in collaboration between Johnson, St Michaels, award-winning architect Jacob Sahlqvist, lighting designer Kate Wilkins, and poet John Tottenham is being presented alongside St Michaels documentary as it travels the world.

Before coming to teach at the Granton campus I worked in a dual role as fine art lecturer, and Installation / site manager for the Exhibitions & Events dept of Edinburgh College of Art.  The work was always varied and challenging but most importantly it was linked to, and supported my practice as an artist. I met some incredible artists and developed a variety of skills. So, when I was approached by my then manager and now Assistant Director of the EIFF, Diane Henderson, ‘to put the band back together’ I jumped at the chance to get involved and share the experience with students.

As well as gaining work experience the students also received passes to the EIFF and invitations to the opening premier and party. A fine return on a job well done!

“EIFF was delighted to work with students from Edinburgh College on the
Inertia Variations exhibition at Summerhall.  The students brought a
wonderful enthusiasm to their role and were an enormous, knowledgeable and
skilled resource.  Alan and his students worked extremely hard over a very
short period of time to install this fantastic exhibition, which in the
end, was a brilliant highlight of EIFF in its anniversary year.  We
couldn¹t have done it without them!”

Dianne Henderson Assistant Artistic Director Edinburgh International Film Festival

To capture the experience for their Professional Practice Portfolio the students, Victoria, Joel and Chris developed a series of questions and responses to help log the experience.

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Alan, Victoria, Chris and Joel at the opening party of EIFF at the National Museum of Scotland.

 Summerhall project interview questions:

Briefly describe the exhibition/project you were involved in:

Victoria Rankin: Help setting up an exhibition/installation called Inertia with our lecturer Alan Holligan, the artists and installation crew.

Chris Coatham: The project, named Radio Cineola: The Inertia Variations, was a collaboration between musician Matt Johnson, filmmaker Johanna St Michaels, architect Jacob Sahlqvist, lighting designer Kate Wilkins and poet John Tottenham. The collaboration resulted in a film and interactive installation based on the ideas and imagery featured in the film. The Summerhall gallery/art space in Edinburgh hosted both the exhibition and film as part of the 71st annual Edinburgh International Film Festival.

Joel Davidson: Radio cineola is a unique installation bringing together the work of musician Matt Johnson, filmmaker Johanna St. Michaels and architect Jacob sahlqvist. Michaels film the inertia variations blends into a conceptual multi media installation that spread throughout the dissection room of summer-hall.
What was the role of Edinburgh college students in the project?

V.R: Our role was to help set up the installation manually. We helped by carrying a lot of the necessary equipment to the dissection room & the other connecting rooms. We sealed the windows in every room to prevent light getting in and also helped construct the radio tower. We also set up lighting in one of the connecting rooms.

C.C: College students were on hand to assist with the installation; our duties included moving equipment and materials into the upstairs space, preparing the space itself including hanging blackout curtains, and assisting with the erection of a tall central “radio mast” which was the centerpiece of the exhibition. We also hung three large projector screens and assembled beds and other props, and hung signage to guide visitors to the exhibition.

J.D: Our role mainly consisted of supporting the needs of the artists by setting up parts of the exhibition as well as helping to erect a 8 metre tall radio tower. The work was rewarding but challenging as we approached certain hurdles when setting this exhibition up in a new setting.
What new skills/experience did you gain?

V.R: I gained work experience in terms of setting up for an exhibition – experience which will be vital in my career as an artist. It was also a pleasure to meet everyone involved. It was definitely a good way to make connections with fellows in the same industry.

C.C: This was our first time helping to install an exhibition that a) was not of our own work and b) was outwith the college. Therefore it was very much a new experience for all of us and it was great to meet the Summerhall and Film Festival staff and work with them.

J.D: This opportunity to work in an exhibition like this was a first for me but hopefully not the last. It gave us an opportunity to learn new skills working in a team along side musicians, filmmakers and designers to help realise an ambitious installation.
What challenges/problems did you face and how did you resolve them?

V.R: There were various challenges when setting up but only minor issues – miscalculations in measurements when we were sealing up all the windows with light-tight fabric. We also had to move a few tonnes of volcanic sand up one floor but we didn’t have the right equipment for the job so it took longer than we expected. These were only minor issues in an otherwise smoothly running operation, I think.

C.C: At times it was hard work to get a task finished on time; for example where a lot of manual handling was involved or where it was difficult to continue without direction from a supervisor, however with initiative and teamwork we overcame these small obstacles to get the job done.
Was the experience what you expected it to be? Why/why not?

V.R: It was tougher physically than I thought it would be but overall I was very pleased with the time I spent there. As mentioned, it was really nice to meet the people involved – the artists and the installation crew. It was such an insight into what goes on behind the scenes of setting up installations. A lot of work goes in – more than I realised. I have definitely benefited from the experience.

C.C: I think I went in to the project expecting it to be quite stressful, and though it was hard work at times, it was not stressful at all and in fact was very rewarding and fun to be involved in.

J.D: The experience overall was what I expected and more.  I did not expect to be working as close to the artists as we did. Helping them tailor the exhibition to a new space and overcome the challenges that this presented will be valuable in the future and was a welcomed break from any heavy lifting.
How did it feel to see the finished exhibition knowing that you had been involved?

V.R: It was an extremely proud moment as the exhibition was extremely interesting in itself.

C.C: At first I found it difficult to visualise how the exhibition would look once it was finished, but as the week progressed and we got closer to being finished it really came together and it was great to see the fruit of our labours (and that of many other people) resulting in such an impressive installation.

J.D: Seeing the final exhibition was a satisfying experience as I believe the work we all put in was vital to the show being ready on time for its opening.
Do you feel that the experience has been a valuable one in terms of gaining work experience? Would you do it again?

V.R: I definitely feel that it has been very valuable and I am so happy to have been involved. I most definitely would do it again, because there is so much to experience and learn from helping to set up an exhibition. It the kind of thing that would be different each time as well, which i find very intriguing and beneficial to my growth as an artist.

C.C: The experience was definitely a positive one and I would certainly do it again. The experience of working together under pressure to achieve a common goal was really rewarding and I would encourage any current or future students to get involved in any similar projects, should the opportunity arise.

J.D: This experience has given me valuable knowledge when it comes to working behind the scenes in a exhibition. The overall process of helping alongside artists, architects etc was a new experience and one that will serve me well in the future if the chance to work in similar conditions comes up again. The free lunches and party was a nice treat too.

 

 

 

 

CAP1 ESW Residency

A few weeks ago it was the turn of CAP1 to take up residence at Edinburgh Sculpture Workshop. Although an annual event for 7 years this was only our 3rd year in the new Bill Scott Sculpture Centre as part of our formal partnership with ESW. Since the new premises opened in June 2012 ESW and the college have had a formal partnership which has ESW designated as an Edinburgh College Employability Centre. The partnership allows students to undertake their Introduction to Sculpture course in a purpose built professional studio & workshop environment for the research, development and production of sculptural practice.

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As well as the formal sculptural practice developed during the residency a number of Professional Practice events took place including wood workshop induction and a talk by ESW Curator of Research Dan Brown who spoke to the residency participants about the facilities, history & philosophy of ESW as well as the education, exhibition and residency programmes. Other events included a studio visit with studio holder Kate Ive and a talk by RSA/ESW International Residency winner Norbert Delman whose exhibition Sweat / Suffer / Success was open in the gallery space. All the talks took place in the new multi function research space at ESW which is flexile enough to have round table talks and discussions as well as presentations. Having access to the space and resources meant we were able to have our annual Moving Image event curated by #exCAPer and regular guest lecturer Benjamin Fallon which was held over two evenings at ESW.

Next May we will return to ESW with CAP2 for their Diploma Exhibition by which time the second phase of the multi £million capital project ‘Creative Laboratories’ will have been open for 6 months and we are looking forward to spending a week working and exhibiting in the new spaces.

Click on the links below to see  blog posts by CAP1 ESW Residents:

Szabolcs Fricska:  http://sfricskacap.tumblr.com/post/101630305745/the-week-that-we-spent-at-the-edinburgh-sculpture

Yulia Vitten: http://iuliiavittencap.tumblr.com/post/101836631621/my-final-sculpture-from-the-week-at-esw-and-small

Magdealen Gunkowska: http://mgunkowskacap.tumblr.com/post/101166933302/my-experiments-with-plaster-and-construction

http://mgunkowskacap.tumblr.com/post/101171457022

Elena Cheltsova: http://echeltsovacap.tumblr.com/post/101429925954/esw-day-3-modelling-with-plaster-thought-of

Freya Taylor: http://freyataylorcap.tumblr.com/post/100831352454/collaborative-installation-lots-of-fun-i-was